HOW THE HOTTEST PLANET IN OUR SOLAR SYSTEM STILL HAS ICE BUILDUP | WHAT REALLY HAPPENED

HOW THE HOTTEST PLANET IN OUR SOLAR SYSTEM STILL HAS ICE BUILDUP

The planetary and sub-planetary bodies in our solar system have displayed all manner of surprising characteristics upon closer inspection. According to NASA, Saturn's moon Titan is so cold that it supports large bodies of liquid methane and ethane, which may even result in sinkhole formation like on Earth. Meanwhile, there's a theory that Saturn's other moon, Enceladus, Jupiter's moon Europa, and even the former planet Pluto (via Scientific American) are among many worlds that possess liquid oceans beneath their surfaces. Frozen water and methane, on the other hand, don't typically stir the imagination. 

Frozen water is relatively plentiful on Earth, while frozen hydrogen and methane is common to the previously mentioned ice worlds. Even Mars, a planet that has long lost any potential liquid water, has icy poles (via Smithsonian National Air and Space Museum). These frozen elements take on a unique quality, however, when it turns out that Venus, the hottest planet in the solar system, has an atmospheric layer that evidently rains frozen carbon dioxide

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