Washington thought it could divide Russia & China. But, despite their differences, they're still set on standing up to US hegemony | WHAT REALLY HAPPENED X-Frame-Options: SAMEORIGIN

Washington thought it could divide Russia & China. But, despite their differences, they're still set on standing up to US hegemony

As tensions rise between East and West in the Pacific Ocean, Russian and Chinese warships have together charted a course through the Tsugaru Straits that divide Japan amid large-scale joint exercises between Moscow and Beijing.

The drills, Maritime Interaction 20201, took place in the Sea of Japan earlier this week. Chinese media has instantly proclaimed that the wargames serve as a counterweight to the newly-announced AUKUS pact between Washington, London and Canberra. The trio of nations have agreed to share nuclear submarine technology and strengthen their joint operations as part of growing US-led efforts to encircle and contain China.

Last week, Russian Foreign Minister Sergey Lavrov reiterated Russia’s position on the increasingly tense question of Taiwan. According to him, Moscow “considers Taiwan to be part of the People’s Republic of China”. He added that “we have proceeded and will proceed from this premise in our foreign policy”. Expanding on that position earlier this month, President Vladimir Putin expressed confidence that China could resolve the Taiwan issue without open conflict.

The rapid fire of commentary from the Kremlin and the increased focus on the Pacific region is no coincidence. There is an important diplomatic message being told: Russia is seeking a closer partnership with China, on a broader range of issues, in the face of policy put forward by US President Joe Biden’s White House.

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