Why are most Afghan evacuees still housed at U.S. military camps? | WHAT REALLY HAPPENED X-Frame-Options: SAMEORIGIN

Why are most Afghan evacuees still housed at U.S. military camps?

When Taliban fighters hunting for Ahmad Shoaib Durgee knocked on his door in Kabul, Afghanistan, he scrambled to escape with his family of six to reunite with his sister in Sacramento.

Afghan evacuees and soldiers play soccer in September at a military camp in Ft. McCoy, Wis. (Pool Photo)© Provided by LA Times Afghan evacuees and soldiers play soccer in September at a military camp in Ft. McCoy, Wis. (Pool Photo)
Two months after they were flown to the U.S., they remain among 53,200 evacuees held at Ft. Lee, Va., and seven other military camps nationwide.

Durgee, 37, who qualified for a visa because he had worked as a security guard for American officials, says he feels fortunate to have been evacuated to a camp where he doesn't have to live in a tent. But he's itching to leave the military housing. After hearing that those headed to California face longer waits, he changed his requested destination to Richmond, Va., where he has friends.

Each afternoon he looked for his name in Ft. Lee’s daily stack of “departure files,” those selected for resettlement.

“I ask them, ‘When my turn comes?’ They say, ‘You will be notified,’” Durgee said by phone last week.

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